personal finance books

Posted by adgag adgadgvadgv on Friday, November 5, 2010

Everywhere you turn these days, some bigwig policymaker is talking about the importance of financial literacy education. Here’s Ben Bernanke doing it. And there’s Tim Geithner and Arne Duncan. Even the President. It’s easy to understand why we feel like we need this, what with all the bad financial decision-making of recent years. The only problem is, there’s a fair amount of evidence that a lot of what we do to teach better financial habits, like courses in high school, doesn’t work. Some research has shown that financial education is more likely to stick if it’s focused on one topic and comes right before a person makes a related decision—learning about mortgages as you’re house shopping, say, or getting a lesson in compounding interest along with your credit card.


But maybe there’s a simpler approach. Maybe we should ignore real-world complexity altogether and just teach people financial rules of thumb.


A presentation at that microfinance conference last week got me going on this train of thought (although I’m by no means the first to ride it). In this experiment, researchers taught one group of small-time entrepreneurs in the Dominican Republic formal accounting, including double-entry bookkeeping, cash and working capital management and investment decision-making. Another group was taught simple rules of thumb, like “keep personal and business accounts separate” and “write everything down.” The results:


People who were offered rule-of-thumb based training showed significant improvements in the way they managed their finances as a result of the training relative to the control group which was not offered training. They were more likely to keep accounting records, calculate monthly revenues and separate their books for the business and the home. Improvements along these dimensions are on the order of a 10% increase. In contrast, we did not find any significant changes for the people in the basic accounting training. It appears that in this context, the rule-of-thumb training is more likely to be implemented by the clients than the basic accounting training.


When I caught up with Greg Fischer to ask what the U.S. consumer-class take-away might be, he was appropriately modest about his findings and hesitated to draw any universal conclusions. I lack such compunction, so let me say that I think this result contains a very important piece of wisdom. People live complicated, busy lives and the learning they are most likely to put to use is that which is simple to remember and implement. In Fischer’s study, some microentrepreneurs received follow-up training at their place of business: an educator stopped by to reinforce concepts and to answer questions. Once this happened, the group that received the formal accounting training applied what they had learned. But unless we want to set up a system in which your high school consumer finance teacher pops back up just in time for your first mortgage, rules of thumb might be the way to go.


And, actually, we already have many them. We just need to dig them out of the dustbin we tossed them into during the free-money euphoria. For example, don’t spend more than 2 1/2 times your annual salary on a house. And don’t take out more student loan debt than you expect to earn in your first year on the job (assuming you have the option). As Jack Bogle once said: ”Your bond position should equal your age. I won’t tell you this is the best investment advice you’ll ever get, but the number of pieces of advice that are worse is infinite.” It’s not terribly complicated to figure out what we need to teach. We just need to jump to it.


Are you an entrepreneur, solo business owner or freelancer? Are you keen to get regular business advice but don’t have the time to work out which blogs to subscribe to? Well, we’ve done the research for you.

Here’s a collection of business blogs aimed at entrepreneurs and small businesses. These have been chosen for their insights, advice, presentation and overall appeal to business people. Hopefully you’ll find these blogs cover all the business management advice and business trends analysis for your needs.

id="more-56526">

1. Harvard Business Review

Harvard Business Review is a staple in any entrepreneur blog collection. The blog delivers timely business analysis and professional management advice.

style="text-align: center;">

2. Young Entrepreneur

When you’re just starting our with your business venture, things can be a little tough. Young Entrepreneur focuses on the things you’ll need to know – financing, bootstrapping, identifying opportunities and making sales.

style="text-align: center;">

3. 64 Notes

64 Notes gets straight to the nuggets of gold by bypassing straightforward management tips and filling each post with those eye-opening things that change your business from alright to amazing. They also write a lot about how to avoid being the start-up that failed.

style="text-align: center;">

4. The Personal MBA

The Personal MBA is a blog dedicated to teaching all the tips and tricks you would have learned if you had done a degree in business. It recommends books, summarises books and draws on advice given freely by great minds in business. If you follow this blog you will learn a great deal about managing your business.

style="text-align: center;">

5. Instigator Blog

Instigator Blog is a very insightful blog, mainly discussing thoughts relevant to small business and entrepreneurs, written by an entrepreneur as he works on his business.

style="text-align: center;">

6. Fast Company

Fast Company is a major business blog, covering business news and trends. It’s vital information if you want to know where business is heading.

style="text-align: center;">

7. Entrepreneur Blog

Entrepreneur Blog is a site dedicated to providing business insights to entrepreneurs. It will analyse business failures, successes and trends, while offering sensible advice for any business owner.

style="text-align: center;">

8. The Entrepreneurial Mind

The Entrepreneurial Mind is a business blog written by a Belmont University professor of Entrepreneurship. His academic insight into the world of the entrepreneur is a great balance to the news and trends offered by other blogs.

style="text-align: center;">

9. Creative Web Biz

Creative Web Biz is a great blog for all the artistic entrepreneurs out there. This is a place for those people who are entrepreneurs, but don’t much care for all the business management advice and trends. This blog is entirely focused on how to get that art out there and sold. Highly recommended for musicians, artists, and makers of other crafts.

style="text-align: center;">

10. Work Happy

Work Happy is a blog offering advice for anyone in business for themselves. It’s useful for freelancers, small business owners and entrepreneurs alike. It features a lot of video presentations from entrepreneurs to keep things interesting.

style="text-align: center;">

Bonus: Entrepreneurship Interviews

Entrepreneurship Interviews added itself on to the list by being a wealth of information in the form of interviews with entrepreneurs. It’s not much to look at, but there is a lot to be gained by listening to what other entrepreneurs say candidly about their own business ventures.

More Blogs

If you’re keen to see some more great blog lists from MakeUseOf, read on:

  • Four Best Inspiring Blogs Every Life Hacker Should Subscribe To
  • 3 Personal Finance Blogs That Will Get You Out Of Debt
  • The 10 Most Stunning Photo Blogs
  • 6 Best Web Design Blogs To Follow
  • The 6 Best Blogs For Architectural & Interior Design Ideas

If you know of other great blogs for business people, let us know in the comments!

Image Credit: Shutterstock


eric seiger

Keith Olbermann suspended after donating to Democrats - Simmi <b>...</b>

Olbermann has been suspending indefinitely after violating NBC's ethics policies.

Small Business <b>News</b>: Building Your Small Business Empire

Thinking big in your small business will stop you from ignoring potential markets, and allow you to try those super cool ideas you might think your business is.

U.S. <b>News</b> &amp; World Report to Cease Printing, Become Online Only <b>...</b>

US News & World Report, the magazine that in recent years has gone from a weekly, to a bi-monthly to a monthly, will no longer exist in the printed form.


eric seiger

Everywhere you turn these days, some bigwig policymaker is talking about the importance of financial literacy education. Here’s Ben Bernanke doing it. And there’s Tim Geithner and Arne Duncan. Even the President. It’s easy to understand why we feel like we need this, what with all the bad financial decision-making of recent years. The only problem is, there’s a fair amount of evidence that a lot of what we do to teach better financial habits, like courses in high school, doesn’t work. Some research has shown that financial education is more likely to stick if it’s focused on one topic and comes right before a person makes a related decision—learning about mortgages as you’re house shopping, say, or getting a lesson in compounding interest along with your credit card.


But maybe there’s a simpler approach. Maybe we should ignore real-world complexity altogether and just teach people financial rules of thumb.


A presentation at that microfinance conference last week got me going on this train of thought (although I’m by no means the first to ride it). In this experiment, researchers taught one group of small-time entrepreneurs in the Dominican Republic formal accounting, including double-entry bookkeeping, cash and working capital management and investment decision-making. Another group was taught simple rules of thumb, like “keep personal and business accounts separate” and “write everything down.” The results:


People who were offered rule-of-thumb based training showed significant improvements in the way they managed their finances as a result of the training relative to the control group which was not offered training. They were more likely to keep accounting records, calculate monthly revenues and separate their books for the business and the home. Improvements along these dimensions are on the order of a 10% increase. In contrast, we did not find any significant changes for the people in the basic accounting training. It appears that in this context, the rule-of-thumb training is more likely to be implemented by the clients than the basic accounting training.


When I caught up with Greg Fischer to ask what the U.S. consumer-class take-away might be, he was appropriately modest about his findings and hesitated to draw any universal conclusions. I lack such compunction, so let me say that I think this result contains a very important piece of wisdom. People live complicated, busy lives and the learning they are most likely to put to use is that which is simple to remember and implement. In Fischer’s study, some microentrepreneurs received follow-up training at their place of business: an educator stopped by to reinforce concepts and to answer questions. Once this happened, the group that received the formal accounting training applied what they had learned. But unless we want to set up a system in which your high school consumer finance teacher pops back up just in time for your first mortgage, rules of thumb might be the way to go.


And, actually, we already have many them. We just need to dig them out of the dustbin we tossed them into during the free-money euphoria. For example, don’t spend more than 2 1/2 times your annual salary on a house. And don’t take out more student loan debt than you expect to earn in your first year on the job (assuming you have the option). As Jack Bogle once said: ”Your bond position should equal your age. I won’t tell you this is the best investment advice you’ll ever get, but the number of pieces of advice that are worse is infinite.” It’s not terribly complicated to figure out what we need to teach. We just need to jump to it.


Are you an entrepreneur, solo business owner or freelancer? Are you keen to get regular business advice but don’t have the time to work out which blogs to subscribe to? Well, we’ve done the research for you.

Here’s a collection of business blogs aimed at entrepreneurs and small businesses. These have been chosen for their insights, advice, presentation and overall appeal to business people. Hopefully you’ll find these blogs cover all the business management advice and business trends analysis for your needs.

id="more-56526">

1. Harvard Business Review

Harvard Business Review is a staple in any entrepreneur blog collection. The blog delivers timely business analysis and professional management advice.

style="text-align: center;">

2. Young Entrepreneur

When you’re just starting our with your business venture, things can be a little tough. Young Entrepreneur focuses on the things you’ll need to know – financing, bootstrapping, identifying opportunities and making sales.

style="text-align: center;">

3. 64 Notes

64 Notes gets straight to the nuggets of gold by bypassing straightforward management tips and filling each post with those eye-opening things that change your business from alright to amazing. They also write a lot about how to avoid being the start-up that failed.

style="text-align: center;">

4. The Personal MBA

The Personal MBA is a blog dedicated to teaching all the tips and tricks you would have learned if you had done a degree in business. It recommends books, summarises books and draws on advice given freely by great minds in business. If you follow this blog you will learn a great deal about managing your business.

style="text-align: center;">

5. Instigator Blog

Instigator Blog is a very insightful blog, mainly discussing thoughts relevant to small business and entrepreneurs, written by an entrepreneur as he works on his business.

style="text-align: center;">

6. Fast Company

Fast Company is a major business blog, covering business news and trends. It’s vital information if you want to know where business is heading.

style="text-align: center;">

7. Entrepreneur Blog

Entrepreneur Blog is a site dedicated to providing business insights to entrepreneurs. It will analyse business failures, successes and trends, while offering sensible advice for any business owner.

style="text-align: center;">

8. The Entrepreneurial Mind

The Entrepreneurial Mind is a business blog written by a Belmont University professor of Entrepreneurship. His academic insight into the world of the entrepreneur is a great balance to the news and trends offered by other blogs.

style="text-align: center;">

9. Creative Web Biz

Creative Web Biz is a great blog for all the artistic entrepreneurs out there. This is a place for those people who are entrepreneurs, but don’t much care for all the business management advice and trends. This blog is entirely focused on how to get that art out there and sold. Highly recommended for musicians, artists, and makers of other crafts.

style="text-align: center;">

10. Work Happy

Work Happy is a blog offering advice for anyone in business for themselves. It’s useful for freelancers, small business owners and entrepreneurs alike. It features a lot of video presentations from entrepreneurs to keep things interesting.

style="text-align: center;">

Bonus: Entrepreneurship Interviews

Entrepreneurship Interviews added itself on to the list by being a wealth of information in the form of interviews with entrepreneurs. It’s not much to look at, but there is a lot to be gained by listening to what other entrepreneurs say candidly about their own business ventures.

More Blogs

If you’re keen to see some more great blog lists from MakeUseOf, read on:

  • Four Best Inspiring Blogs Every Life Hacker Should Subscribe To
  • 3 Personal Finance Blogs That Will Get You Out Of Debt
  • The 10 Most Stunning Photo Blogs
  • 6 Best Web Design Blogs To Follow
  • The 6 Best Blogs For Architectural & Interior Design Ideas

If you know of other great blogs for business people, let us know in the comments!

Image Credit: Shutterstock


eric seiger

Keith Olbermann suspended after donating to Democrats - Simmi <b>...</b>

Olbermann has been suspending indefinitely after violating NBC's ethics policies.

Small Business <b>News</b>: Building Your Small Business Empire

Thinking big in your small business will stop you from ignoring potential markets, and allow you to try those super cool ideas you might think your business is.

U.S. <b>News</b> &amp; World Report to Cease Printing, Become Online Only <b>...</b>

US News & World Report, the magazine that in recent years has gone from a weekly, to a bi-monthly to a monthly, will no longer exist in the printed form.


eric seiger

eric seiger

eric seiger

Keith Olbermann suspended after donating to Democrats - Simmi <b>...</b>

Olbermann has been suspending indefinitely after violating NBC's ethics policies.

Small Business <b>News</b>: Building Your Small Business Empire

Thinking big in your small business will stop you from ignoring potential markets, and allow you to try those super cool ideas you might think your business is.

U.S. <b>News</b> &amp; World Report to Cease Printing, Become Online Only <b>...</b>

US News & World Report, the magazine that in recent years has gone from a weekly, to a bi-monthly to a monthly, will no longer exist in the printed form.


eric seiger

Everywhere you turn these days, some bigwig policymaker is talking about the importance of financial literacy education. Here’s Ben Bernanke doing it. And there’s Tim Geithner and Arne Duncan. Even the President. It’s easy to understand why we feel like we need this, what with all the bad financial decision-making of recent years. The only problem is, there’s a fair amount of evidence that a lot of what we do to teach better financial habits, like courses in high school, doesn’t work. Some research has shown that financial education is more likely to stick if it’s focused on one topic and comes right before a person makes a related decision—learning about mortgages as you’re house shopping, say, or getting a lesson in compounding interest along with your credit card.


But maybe there’s a simpler approach. Maybe we should ignore real-world complexity altogether and just teach people financial rules of thumb.


A presentation at that microfinance conference last week got me going on this train of thought (although I’m by no means the first to ride it). In this experiment, researchers taught one group of small-time entrepreneurs in the Dominican Republic formal accounting, including double-entry bookkeeping, cash and working capital management and investment decision-making. Another group was taught simple rules of thumb, like “keep personal and business accounts separate” and “write everything down.” The results:


People who were offered rule-of-thumb based training showed significant improvements in the way they managed their finances as a result of the training relative to the control group which was not offered training. They were more likely to keep accounting records, calculate monthly revenues and separate their books for the business and the home. Improvements along these dimensions are on the order of a 10% increase. In contrast, we did not find any significant changes for the people in the basic accounting training. It appears that in this context, the rule-of-thumb training is more likely to be implemented by the clients than the basic accounting training.


When I caught up with Greg Fischer to ask what the U.S. consumer-class take-away might be, he was appropriately modest about his findings and hesitated to draw any universal conclusions. I lack such compunction, so let me say that I think this result contains a very important piece of wisdom. People live complicated, busy lives and the learning they are most likely to put to use is that which is simple to remember and implement. In Fischer’s study, some microentrepreneurs received follow-up training at their place of business: an educator stopped by to reinforce concepts and to answer questions. Once this happened, the group that received the formal accounting training applied what they had learned. But unless we want to set up a system in which your high school consumer finance teacher pops back up just in time for your first mortgage, rules of thumb might be the way to go.


And, actually, we already have many them. We just need to dig them out of the dustbin we tossed them into during the free-money euphoria. For example, don’t spend more than 2 1/2 times your annual salary on a house. And don’t take out more student loan debt than you expect to earn in your first year on the job (assuming you have the option). As Jack Bogle once said: ”Your bond position should equal your age. I won’t tell you this is the best investment advice you’ll ever get, but the number of pieces of advice that are worse is infinite.” It’s not terribly complicated to figure out what we need to teach. We just need to jump to it.


Are you an entrepreneur, solo business owner or freelancer? Are you keen to get regular business advice but don’t have the time to work out which blogs to subscribe to? Well, we’ve done the research for you.

Here’s a collection of business blogs aimed at entrepreneurs and small businesses. These have been chosen for their insights, advice, presentation and overall appeal to business people. Hopefully you’ll find these blogs cover all the business management advice and business trends analysis for your needs.

id="more-56526">

1. Harvard Business Review

Harvard Business Review is a staple in any entrepreneur blog collection. The blog delivers timely business analysis and professional management advice.

style="text-align: center;">

2. Young Entrepreneur

When you’re just starting our with your business venture, things can be a little tough. Young Entrepreneur focuses on the things you’ll need to know – financing, bootstrapping, identifying opportunities and making sales.

style="text-align: center;">

3. 64 Notes

64 Notes gets straight to the nuggets of gold by bypassing straightforward management tips and filling each post with those eye-opening things that change your business from alright to amazing. They also write a lot about how to avoid being the start-up that failed.

style="text-align: center;">

4. The Personal MBA

The Personal MBA is a blog dedicated to teaching all the tips and tricks you would have learned if you had done a degree in business. It recommends books, summarises books and draws on advice given freely by great minds in business. If you follow this blog you will learn a great deal about managing your business.

style="text-align: center;">

5. Instigator Blog

Instigator Blog is a very insightful blog, mainly discussing thoughts relevant to small business and entrepreneurs, written by an entrepreneur as he works on his business.

style="text-align: center;">

6. Fast Company

Fast Company is a major business blog, covering business news and trends. It’s vital information if you want to know where business is heading.

style="text-align: center;">

7. Entrepreneur Blog

Entrepreneur Blog is a site dedicated to providing business insights to entrepreneurs. It will analyse business failures, successes and trends, while offering sensible advice for any business owner.

style="text-align: center;">

8. The Entrepreneurial Mind

The Entrepreneurial Mind is a business blog written by a Belmont University professor of Entrepreneurship. His academic insight into the world of the entrepreneur is a great balance to the news and trends offered by other blogs.

style="text-align: center;">

9. Creative Web Biz

Creative Web Biz is a great blog for all the artistic entrepreneurs out there. This is a place for those people who are entrepreneurs, but don’t much care for all the business management advice and trends. This blog is entirely focused on how to get that art out there and sold. Highly recommended for musicians, artists, and makers of other crafts.

style="text-align: center;">

10. Work Happy

Work Happy is a blog offering advice for anyone in business for themselves. It’s useful for freelancers, small business owners and entrepreneurs alike. It features a lot of video presentations from entrepreneurs to keep things interesting.

style="text-align: center;">

Bonus: Entrepreneurship Interviews

Entrepreneurship Interviews added itself on to the list by being a wealth of information in the form of interviews with entrepreneurs. It’s not much to look at, but there is a lot to be gained by listening to what other entrepreneurs say candidly about their own business ventures.

More Blogs

If you’re keen to see some more great blog lists from MakeUseOf, read on:

  • Four Best Inspiring Blogs Every Life Hacker Should Subscribe To
  • 3 Personal Finance Blogs That Will Get You Out Of Debt
  • The 10 Most Stunning Photo Blogs
  • 6 Best Web Design Blogs To Follow
  • The 6 Best Blogs For Architectural & Interior Design Ideas

If you know of other great blogs for business people, let us know in the comments!

Image Credit: Shutterstock


eric seiger

eric seiger

Keith Olbermann suspended after donating to Democrats - Simmi <b>...</b>

Olbermann has been suspending indefinitely after violating NBC's ethics policies.

Small Business <b>News</b>: Building Your Small Business Empire

Thinking big in your small business will stop you from ignoring potential markets, and allow you to try those super cool ideas you might think your business is.

U.S. <b>News</b> &amp; World Report to Cease Printing, Become Online Only <b>...</b>

US News & World Report, the magazine that in recent years has gone from a weekly, to a bi-monthly to a monthly, will no longer exist in the printed form.


eric seiger

eric seiger

Keith Olbermann suspended after donating to Democrats - Simmi <b>...</b>

Olbermann has been suspending indefinitely after violating NBC's ethics policies.

Small Business <b>News</b>: Building Your Small Business Empire

Thinking big in your small business will stop you from ignoring potential markets, and allow you to try those super cool ideas you might think your business is.

U.S. <b>News</b> &amp; World Report to Cease Printing, Become Online Only <b>...</b>

US News & World Report, the magazine that in recent years has gone from a weekly, to a bi-monthly to a monthly, will no longer exist in the printed form.


eric seiger

Keith Olbermann suspended after donating to Democrats - Simmi <b>...</b>

Olbermann has been suspending indefinitely after violating NBC's ethics policies.

Small Business <b>News</b>: Building Your Small Business Empire

Thinking big in your small business will stop you from ignoring potential markets, and allow you to try those super cool ideas you might think your business is.

U.S. <b>News</b> &amp; World Report to Cease Printing, Become Online Only <b>...</b>

US News & World Report, the magazine that in recent years has gone from a weekly, to a bi-monthly to a monthly, will no longer exist in the printed form.


eric seiger

Keith Olbermann suspended after donating to Democrats - Simmi <b>...</b>

Olbermann has been suspending indefinitely after violating NBC's ethics policies.

Small Business <b>News</b>: Building Your Small Business Empire

Thinking big in your small business will stop you from ignoring potential markets, and allow you to try those super cool ideas you might think your business is.

U.S. <b>News</b> &amp; World Report to Cease Printing, Become Online Only <b>...</b>

US News & World Report, the magazine that in recent years has gone from a weekly, to a bi-monthly to a monthly, will no longer exist in the printed form.


eric seiger eric seiger
eric seiger

eric seiger
eric seiger

Keith Olbermann suspended after donating to Democrats - Simmi <b>...</b>

Olbermann has been suspending indefinitely after violating NBC's ethics policies.

Small Business <b>News</b>: Building Your Small Business Empire

Thinking big in your small business will stop you from ignoring potential markets, and allow you to try those super cool ideas you might think your business is.

U.S. <b>News</b> &amp; World Report to Cease Printing, Become Online Only <b>...</b>

US News & World Report, the magazine that in recent years has gone from a weekly, to a bi-monthly to a monthly, will no longer exist in the printed form.


big seminar 14

We live in a country where millions of citizens have found themselves in overwhelming amounts of debt. Students have been taught throughout their lives about math. science, history, English, health and countless other subjects. Most students are required to be taught basic sewing and cooking, foreign languages, woodworking, and even welding. Yet there is no mandatory class to teach them about the importance of managing their income, expenses and debt. This seems like a gross oversight to me.

Even the elective classes which do cover some business and economics have rarely discussed personal finance at length. The extent of their discussions are usually how to balance a checkbook, and/or how to follow the stock market.

There are people who would argue that personal finance is the sort of subject that is traditionally left to the parents to teach their children. The primary purpose of schooling is and has always been to prepare students, both mentally and socially, for the rigors of their adult lives. 50 years ago, their influence may have been limited to traditional subjects, but today's school system is involved in many aspects of a young adults life. Moreover, the rules which govern personal finance are not subjective. They are systematic and beneficial to everyone.

Most of the students in recent generations have followed a similar, destructive path in their personal finances. After receiving a weekly allowance, perhaps working a part-time job while in high school, they are set loose in college to manage their expenses. While they were in high school they bought CDs, went out with their friends, and went to special events with their money. In college, they find that they must pay for food, housing, books, supplies, and transit costs. Even if they work while going to school, and even if their schooling is fully funded, there are unexpected costs that inevitably occur the first time away from home.

More to the point, the student has already become accustomed to being able to spend their money on non-essentials. They have begun to feel entitled to these essentials ("I earned it, after all") whether or not these costs are covered. Add to this the extensive presence of credit card and 'private student loan' companies on college campuses, and you have a recipe for disaster. They have not been taught to be wary of the buy now, pay later mentality.

If the student does not go to college, or has the luxury of having their expenses paid for, they will still suffer when they inevitably must manage their own finances in their adult life.

It is not a coincidence that so many adults in their early 20s make financial mistakes, which they will pay for for many years to come. It is simply a product of the system we have put into place. High school students must be taught the basics of personal finance if they are to thrive in today's economic world.


eric seiger

Keith Olbermann suspended after donating to Democrats - Simmi <b>...</b>

Olbermann has been suspending indefinitely after violating NBC's ethics policies.

Small Business <b>News</b>: Building Your Small Business Empire

Thinking big in your small business will stop you from ignoring potential markets, and allow you to try those super cool ideas you might think your business is.

U.S. <b>News</b> &amp; World Report to Cease Printing, Become Online Only <b>...</b>

US News & World Report, the magazine that in recent years has gone from a weekly, to a bi-monthly to a monthly, will no longer exist in the printed form.


eric seiger

Keith Olbermann suspended after donating to Democrats - Simmi <b>...</b>

Olbermann has been suspending indefinitely after violating NBC's ethics policies.

Small Business <b>News</b>: Building Your Small Business Empire

Thinking big in your small business will stop you from ignoring potential markets, and allow you to try those super cool ideas you might think your business is.

U.S. <b>News</b> &amp; World Report to Cease Printing, Become Online Only <b>...</b>

US News & World Report, the magazine that in recent years has gone from a weekly, to a bi-monthly to a monthly, will no longer exist in the printed form.


eric seiger

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